Effect of chromium supplementation on glucose tolerance in basketball player during competition season

Por: Ching-fong Chen, Fu-hsin Su, Kuei-chien Peng, Mu-tsung Chen e Yu-kuo Lee.

Athens 2004: Pre-olympic Congress

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Introduction

Previous study has found that chromium picolinate supplementation improves glucose tolerance in diabetes patients, but it effect on basketball player is not known. During competition season, glycogen reserve for competition relies on sufficient insulin action for glucose uptake. However, insulin sensitivity is also found to be affected by the level of muscle damage and cortisol level, which could be elevated during the competition period. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the effect of oral chromium picolinate on insulin sensitivity in basketball players.

Methods

Twenty basketball players during competition was were randomly divided into two groups: chromium picolinate supplemented (C, N= 10) and placebo (P, N=10). Oral glucose tolerance was performed under fasted condition. Glucose and insulin level was measured. The levels of blood creatine kinase and serum cortisol were measured under fasted condition.

Results

Chromium picolinate supplementation was not affect glucose level during the season. Insulin level during OGTT was significantly lowered by chromium supplementation. In addition, serum cortisol and blood CK in both groups were not different.

Discussion/Conclusion

During competition season, chromium picolinate supplementation significantly improved glucose tolerance. We also found that this improvement was not associated with blood CK and serum cortisol levels.

References

[1]. Althuis MD, Jordan NE, Ludington EA, Wittes JT. Glucose and insulin responses to dietary chromium supplements: a meta-analysis.
[2]. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jul;76(1):148-55.

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